Speech ... on the motion for the second reading of the Customs and Inland Revenue bill
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Speech ... on the motion for the second reading of the Customs and Inland Revenue bill delivered in theHouse of Commons, Thursday April 26th, 1883. by W. Farrer Ecroyd

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Published by King in London .
Written in


Book details:

The Physical Object
Pagination23 p.
Number of Pages23
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21444813M

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The “Speech on the Revenue Collection [Force] Bill” rigorously applies the principles of the Fort Hill Address to the particular issue of the tariff. Few, if any, of Calhoun’s speeches can rival his remarks on the Force Bill for clarity and powers of rhetoric. HM Revenue and Customs HM Treasury Cabinet Office Scotland Wales5 Northern Ireland6 Small and Independent Bodies Reserves7 Adjustment for Budget Exchange8 Total Capital DEL Remove CDEL not in PSGI Allowance for shortfall10   APPROPRIATION (/19 CONFIRMATION AND VALIDATION) BILL. Second Reading. Hon CHRIS HIPKINS (Leader of the House) on behalf of the Minister of Finance: I move, That the Appropriation (/19 Confirmation and Validation) Bill be now read a second time. Bill read a second time. Books at Amazon. The Books homepage helps you explore Earth's Biggest Bookstore without ever leaving the comfort of your couch. Here you'll find current best sellers in books, new releases in books, deals in books, Kindle .

  The second reading of the second franchise bill was moved on 6 Nov., when Colonel Stanley (afterwards sixteenth earl of Derby) repeated the amendment of Lord John Manners. Next day the bill was read a second time by a majority of ; no amendments were made in committee, and by 13 Nov. it was back in the lords. The chief sources of revenue were customs duties, taxes on land and industries, duties on tobacco and breadstuffs, the Lisbon octroi, receipts from national property, registration and stamps, &c. The heaviest expenditure (nearly £ 5,,) was incurred for the service of the consolidated debt; payments for the civil list, cortes, pensions. The second expedient is as impracticable as the first would be unwise. As long as the reason of man continues fallible, and he is at liberty to exercise it, different opinions will be formed. As long as the connection subsists between his reason and his self-love, his opinions and his passions will have a reciprocal influence on each other; and.   On 8 June the tories forced an important division on the second reading of the Customs and Inland Revenue Bill, by which the beer and spirit duties were to be increased. Parnell voted with the tories, and the government were defeated by votes to (thirty-nine Irish members voting in the majority).

The first three chapters of the first book of the Wealth of Nations, on the division of labour, correspond with §§ of ‘Cheapness or Plenty’ in the lectures; chapter iv, on money, corresponds with § 8, and chapters v, vi and vii, on prices, correspond with § 7; Book II, chapter iv, on stock lent at interest, corresponds with § —A.J. BALFOUR, on the Second Reading of the Land Bill, May 4th, The reason for the importance of the system of land tenure in the social conditions of Ireland is to be found in the manner in which the restrictions on Irish commerce in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries drove the population to secure a livelihood in the only. White-Fang even bristled up to him and walked stiff-legged, but Lip-lip ignored the challenge. He was no fool himself, and whatever vengeance he desired to wreak, he could wait until he caught White Fang alone. Later on that day, Kiche and White Fang strayed into the edge of the woods next to the camp.   Introduction. In May , the Daily Mail reported that nine ‘illegal immigrants’ were caught climbing down a German food tanker all covered in flour ().The lorry was stationed on the hard shoulder on one stretch of the M26 near Kent, the main access road connecting mainland Britain to France via the Channel by: